Trends In Diabetes Risk Factors And Related Premature Mortality In African Countries

  • : Ms Word Format
  • : 67 Pages
  • : ₦5000
  • : 1-5 Chapters
  •  
  • Click to DOWNLOAD Materials

TRENDS IN DIABETES RISK FACTORS AND RELATED PREMATURE MORTALITY IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES

The poor health of South Africans is known to be associated with a quadruple disease burden. In the second National Burden of Disease (NBD) study, we aimed to analyse cause of death data for 1997–2012 and develop national, population group, and provincial estimates of the levels and causes of mortality.

We used underlying cause of death data from death notifications for 1997–2012 obtained from Statistics South Africa. These data were adjusted for completeness using indirect demographic techniques for adults and comparison with survey and census estimates for child mortality. A regression approach was used to estimate misclassified HIV/AIDS deaths and so-called garbage codes were proportionally redistributed by age, sex, and population group population group (black African, Indian or Asian descent, white [European descent] , and coloured [of mixed ancestry according to the preceding categories] ). Injury deaths were estimated from additional data sources. Age-standardised death rates were calculated with mid-year population estimates and the WHO age standard. Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation Global Burden of Disease (IHME GBD) estimates for South Africa were obtained from the IHME GHDx website for comparison.

All-cause age-standardised death rates increased rapidly since 1997, peaked in 2006 and then declined, driven by changes in HIV/AIDS. Mortality from tuberculosis, non-communicable diseases, and injuries decreased slightly. In 2012, HIV/AIDS caused the most deaths (29·1%) followed by cerebrovascular disease (7·5%) and lower respiratory infections (4·9%). All-cause age-standardised death rates were 1·7 times higher in the province with the highest death rate compared to the province with the lowest death rate, 2·2 times higher in black Africans compared to whites, and 1·4 times higher in males compared with females. Comparison with the IHME GBD estimates for South Africa revealed substantial differences for estimated deaths from all causes, particularly HIV/AIDS and interpersonal violence.

TABLE OF CONTENT

Chapter One            Introduction

1.1         Background of the study

1.2         Statement of the problem

1.3         Purpose of the study

1.4         Significance of study

1.5         Research questions

1.6         Scope of study

1.7         Limitation of study

1.8         Definition of terms

Chapter Two

2.0         Literature Review

Chapter Three

3.0         Methodology

Chapter Four

4.0              Data Analysis

Chapter Five 

5.0         Summary, Conclusion and Recommendations

References Questionnaires

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Reply